DigLitWeb: Digital Literature Web

A-M

Hunting of the Snark (Fig 4)  

M de Metapáginas Esta secção contém  metapáginas que indexam fontes electrónicas relevantes para o campo dos Estudos Ingleses e Americanos, incluindo bases de dados bibliográficas.

M for Metapages This section contains a sample of metapages that index electronic resources in the field of English and American Studies, including bibliographical databases.

   

NB: Os textos de apresentação de cada metapágina pertencem aos responsáveis dos projectos e foram transcritos da página de apresentação correspondente ao URL indicado.

NB: Annotations on the selected metapages belong to their respective editors and authors, and they have been transcribed from the self-presentation contained in the webpage.

 


BHO

Book History Online

http://www.kb.nl/bho/

International Bibliography of the History of the Printed Book and Libraries

National Library of the Netherlands

 

BHO is a database in English on the history of the printed book and libraries. It contains titles of books and articles on the history of the printed book worldwide. It is based on ABHB, the Annual Bibliography of the History of the printed Book and Libraries. This annual book publication (published under the auspices of the Committee on Rare Books and Manuscripts of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions) is produced in collaboration with editors in more than 30 countries. Since 1989, the Department of Special Collections of the KB (Koninklijke Bibliotheek, National Library of the Netherlands) has formed the editorial board and maintained a cumulative database. The database contains 28,200 records. The files can be searched by names of authors, editors, title words (including periodicals), classification, geographical keywords, names of persons (printers, publishers etc.), firms and institutions, and by subjects and words in annotations.

 


Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes

La Biblioteca de las Culturas Hispanicas

http://www.cervantesvirtual.com/index.jsp

 


British Fiction 1800-1829:

A Database of Production, Circulation, and Reception [1997-2004]

http://www.british-fiction.cf.ac.uk/

Editor: Peter Garside

 

British Fiction, 1800–1829: A Database of Production, Circulation, and Reception was produced in Cardiff University’s Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research, supported by substantial grants from the Arts and Humanities Research Board (AHRB) and Cardiff University. British Fiction allows users to examine bibliographical records of 2,272 works of fiction written by approximately 900 authors, along with a large number of contemporary materials (including anecdotal records, circulating-library catalogues, newspaper advertisements, reviews, and subscription lists).

 


CELT
Corpus of Electronic Texts
[1997-present]

http://www.ucc.ie/celt/index.html

University College Cork

 

CELT, the Corpus of Electronic Texts, brings the wealth of Irish literary and historical culture to the Internet, for the use and benefit of everyone worldwide. It has a searchable online database consisting of contemporary and historical texts from many areas, including literature and the other arts.

 


Eighteenth-Century Resources – Literature

http://newark.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/18th/lit.html

Edited by Jack Lynch (Rutgers University, Newark)

 

These pages cover all the significant and reliable Internet resources I've been able to discover that focus on the (very long) eighteenth century -- let's say Milton to Keats. The collection includes information on literature, history, art, music, religion, economics, philosophy, and so on, from around the world, as well as the home pages of societies and people who work on eighteenth-century topics. The site is aimed especially at scholars and students; I've excluded many sites of interest only to fans, historical re-enactors, &c. As a rule, I've excluded commercial sites, breaking that rule only when there seemed to be genuinely useful information on a commercial page.

I've divided links into two large groups: pointers to Web and Gopher sites are on the main pages, but I also have a set of pages devoted to electronic texts of eighteenth-century authors. Everything except the electronic texts now includes a brief annotation, giving some hint about what's featured on the site, as well as some technical information (graphics-heavy pages that take a long time to load over phone lines, pages that require specific browsers, &c.). Though I try to give some sense of the scholarly value of the pages, I must disavow specialist knowledge in most of the fields I comment on -- I'm not qualified to judge whether a bibliography of Barbauld includes all the major scholia, or whether a biography of Hume takes into account discoveries since Mossner, let alone whether the German-language discussion of Albrecht von Haller is reliable. I've had to be content to look for the usual hallmarks of scholarly responsibility. Of course I welcome suggestions and corrections from specialists.

Jack Lynch

 


The English Novel, 1830–1836
A Bibliographical Survey of Fiction Published in the British Isles
[2001-2006]

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/encap/journals/corvey/1830s/index.html

Compiled by Peter Garside and Anthony Mandal

 

In April 2001, the Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research (CEIR) at Cardiff University began a two-year pilot project, funded by the British Academy, to produce a bibliography of British fiction spanning the years 1830–36. This follows on from the cut-off date of the recently published bibliography, The English Novel, 1770–1829: A Bibliographical Survey of Fiction Published in the British Isles (OUP, 2000), edited by Peter Garside, James Raven, and Rainer Schöwerling. CEIR has collaborated once again with the Projekt Corvey team at Paderborn University in order to extend the bibliographical record so that the entirety of the Romantic era will be covered.

 


English Online Resources

http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/eng-on.html

Electronic Text Center (University of Virginia)

 

We provide free access to any texts that we can legally make publicly available. These texts are not necessarily public domain. The texts that are restricted to UVA or VIVA use are typically commercial products whose vendors place these restrictions on us.

Publicly-accessible ebooks, texts, and images

While many of these items are made publicly-accessible, they are not all public domain -- the vast majority of the images, and a number of the texts, including all of those from the University of Virginia Special Collections Department, are copyrighted to the University of Virginia Library, for example, and a number of other texts are still copyrighted to their original print publishers and made available here with permission. We have put thousands of hours of work -- and tens of thousands of dollars -- into scanning texts and images, tagging and proof-reading them, and we hope the results are useful to a broad audience.

 


Irish Resources in the Humanities [1999-present]

http://www.irith.org/index.jsp

Editor: Susan Schreibman (Royal Irish Academy)

 

Irish Resources in the Humanities was developed in 1999 at University College Dublin by Dr Susan Schreibman as a Gateway to sites on the World Wide Web that contain substantial content in the various disciplines of the humanities in the area of Irish Studies. As a rule, commercial sites are not linked. In Spring 2002 the site, originally constructed as a set of HTML pages, was converted to an xml-based database at Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH). In early 2006, the University of Maryland Libraries replaced the XML database with a relational database.

 


Iter

Gateway to the Middle Ages and Renaissance [1997-present]

http://www.itergateway.org/

 

Iter is pleased to present an online, OpenURL-enabled bibliography of more than 1,010,000 records for articles, essays, books, dissertation abstracts, encyclopedia entries and reviews. This material has been collected from 8,707 publications, including 1,707 journals. Updated daily, with thousands of new records added annually, this powerful research tool is of essential use to scholars of the Middle Ages and / or the Renaissance (400-1700).

The bibliography is designed with the professional scholar in mind, but its user-friendly format makes it attractive for both graduate and undergraduate students, as well as the general public. The search interface permits expert searching by keyword, title, author and, for selected records, by Library of Congress subject headings and Dewey Decimal Classification. The interface supports Boolean and positional operators, and allows limiting by language, publication type and publication year. Results lists can be sorted by author, subject, title, relevance or publication year. Records can be marked and conveniently e-mailed or downloaded.

 

[subscription | assinatura]

 


LION

Literature Online (Third Edition, 2004) [1996-present]

http://lion.chadwyck.co.uk/

 

A fully searchable library of more than 330,000 works of English and American poetry, drama and prose, plus biographies, bibliographies and key criticism and reference resources (development 1996-2004).

Literature Online is a virtual library of more than 350,000 works of English and American poetry, drama, and prose written between the 8th century and the present day. It is a full-text database: in other words, the actual text of the printed work is included in each case.

Literature Online is fully searchable. At its simplest you can search the entire database for occurrences of a particular word. More complex searches can look for particular phrases, combinations of words or variant spellings. Other criteria can also be brought to bear, such as the author's nationality or gender, literary period and movement, and publication date. Many of these criteria can be combined to build up a precise and targeted search of the texts in Literature Online.

 

[subscription | assinatura]

 


The Literary Encyclopedia [2000-present]

http://www.LitEncyc.com/

Editor-in-Chief: Robert Clark (University of East Anglia, Norwich)

Founding Editors: Robert Clark (University of East Anglia, Norwich); Emory Elliott (University of California, Riverside); Janet Todd ( University of Glasgow)

 

The Literary Encyclopedia is a free scholarly publication owned collectively by its contributors, most of whom teach in universities. Its entries represent the state of the art in scholarly understanding.

The publication currently has 15-18,000 visits each week and will have received around 600,000 visits in 2003, three years since it first appeared. To date we have over 700 distinguished contributors, more than 1650 completed entries and indexed entries on 5150 writers, 14,500 works and 1275 topics. We welcome suggestions for improvement to the service we provide and offers of contribution from established scholars and researchers.

[subscription | assinatura]

 


N I N E S
A Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-Century Electronic Scholarship
[2003-present]

http://www.nines.org/

 

NINES includes various kinds of content: traditional texts and documents — editions, bibliographic entries, and critical works of all kinds — as well as "born-digital" materials relating to all aspects of nineteenth-century culture. NINES is a model and working example for scholarship that takes advantage of digital resources and internet connectivity, while allowing scholars to integrate their contributions fully into their local IT environments. It provides scholars with access to a federated digital environment and a suite of computerized analytic and interpretive tools. A key goal of NINES is to go beyond presenting static images or transcriptions of manuscripts on-screen. Software tools that aid collation, comparative analysis, and enable pedagogical application of scholarly electronic resources expose the richness of the electronic medium.

 


Project Gutenberg  [1971-present]

http://promo.net/pg/

Project Gutenberg & PROMO.NET

 

Project Gutenberg is the brainchild of Michael Hart, who in 1971 decided that it would be a really good idea if lots of famous and important texts were freely available to everyone in the world. Since then, he has been joined by hundreds of volunteers who share his vision. Now, more than thirty years later, Project Gutenberg has the following figures (as of November 8th 2002): 203 New eBooks released during October 2002, 1975 New eBooks produced in 2002 (they were 1240 in 2001) for a total of 6267 Total Project Gutenberg eBooks. 119 eBooks have been posted so far by Project Gutenberg of Australia.

 


Online Literary Criticism Collection

http://www.ipl.org/div/litcrit/

ipl: Internet Public Library, University of Michigan (1995-2008); Drexel University (2009-present)

ipl2: Internet Public Library and Librarians Internet Index (LII)

 

The ipl2 Literary Criticism Collection contains critical and biographical websites about authors and their works that can be browsed by author, by title, or by nationality and literary period.

 


SHARP Web [1995-present]

Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing

http://www.sharpweb.org/

Editor: Patrick Leary

 

"Book history," reports the Chronicle of Higher Education, has become "a particularly hot topic in the humanities and not just in the United States." The history of the book is not only about books per se: broadly speaking, it concerns the creation, dissemination, and reception of script and print, including newspapers, periodicals, and ephemera. Book historians study the social, cultural, and economic history of authorship; the history of the book trade, copyright, censorship, and underground publishing; the publishing histories of particular literary works, authors, editors, imprints, and literary agents; the spread of literacy and book distribution; canon formation and the politics of literary criticism; libraries, reading habits, and reader response.

The Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing was created in 1991 to provide a global network for book historians, who until then had usually worked in isolation. SHARP now has over 1000 members in over 20 countries, including professors of literature, historians, librarians, publishing professionals, sociologists, bibliophiles, classicists, booksellers, art historians, reading instructors, and independent scholars.

 


Women's Studies Databases [1992-present]

http://www.mith2.umd.edu/WomensStudies/index.html

University of Maryland

 

The University of Maryland women's studies web site, begun in September 1992, serves those people interested in the women's studies profession and in general women's issues.

 


Women’s Studies Resources - Literature [-2006]

http://bailiwick.lib.uiowa.edu/wstudies/literature.html

Compiled & edited by Karla Tonella, University of Iowa

 


 

 

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